The Latest Attorneys general are split on opioid settlement

HARTFORD, Conn. — The Latest on a tentative settlement between governments and OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma (all times local):___5:05 p.m.State attorneys general are offering mixed opinions on a tentative opioid-crisis settlement reached between governments and OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma, owned by the Sackler family.Arizona Republican Attorney General Mark Brnovich says that “this is the quickest and surest way to get immediate relief for Arizona and for the communities that have been harmed by the opioid crisis and the actions of the Sackler family.”Ohio Republican Attorney General Dave Yost’s office says the tentative deal “provides the greatest certainty for all Ohioans to receive relief as quickly as possible in light of rumoured bankruptcy.”But Democratic Connecticut Attorney General William Tong says “the scope and scale of the pain, death and destruction that Purdue and the Sacklers have caused far exceeds anything that has been offered thus far.”Democratic Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro says the tentative deal is “a slap in the face to everyone who has had to bury a loved one due to this family’s destruction and greed. It allows the Sackler family to walk away billionaires and admit no wrongdoing.”___3:35 p.m.Nearly half the states and some 2,000 local governments have agreed to a tentative settlement with OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma over the toll of the nation’s opioid crisis.Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich said the agreement reached Wednesday included more money from the family that owns Purdue than had been offered previously.He told The Associated Press the tentative settlement deal was the quickest way to get relief for communities devastated by the opioid epidemic.Sources with direct knowledge of the talks say that Stamford, Connecticut-based Purdue will pay up to $12 billion over time and that the Sackler family will give up control of the company. The sources spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly.Paul Farrell is an attorney for several local governments. He said in a text message that they have agreed to a deal that has been on the table for several weeks.Even with Wednesday’s development, roughly half the states had not signed on. Several state attorneys general vowed to continue their legal battles against the company and the Sacklers.— Associated Press writers Geoff Mulvihill and Dave Collins___3:10 p.m.Attorneys for some 2,000 local governments say they have agreed to a tentative settlement with OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma over the toll of the nation’s opioid crisis.Attorney Paul Farrell said in a text message Wednesday that they have agreed to a deal that has been on the table for several weeks.Sources with direct knowledge of the talks say that Stamford, Connecticut-based Purdue will pay up to $12 billion over time and that the Sackler family, which owns the company, will give up control. The sources spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly.The offer is the same as one publicly reported several weeks ago. It was not clear whether the announcement signalled the end of the fraught negotiations to reach a nationwide settlement with Purdue or moved the talks into a new phase.One of the sources speaking on condition of anonymity said more than 20 states also had agreed to the tentative settlement.But many state attorneys general say they remained opposed, and more than 20 have sued the Sacklers separately in state court.— Associated Press writers Geoff Mulvihill and Dave Collins___3 p.m.Attorneys representing some 2,000 local governments say they have agreed to a tentative settlement with OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma over the toll of the nation’s opioid crisis.Attorney Paul Farrell says in a text message Wednesday that they have agreed to a deal in which Stamford, Connecticut-based Purdue would pay up to $12 billion and have the Sackler family, which owns the company, give up control.The offer is the same as one publicly reported several weeks ago. It was not clear whether the announcement signalled the end of the fraught negotiations to reach a nationwide settlement with Purdue or moved the talks into a new phase.The Associated Press read more

UN partnership puts marmalade from Ethiopian village on Eataly store shelves

“The jam jars are an example of the powerful role that such creative partnerships can make in empowering family farmers and facilitating their access to global markets,” the Rome-based United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) said in a press release.FAO and Eataly joined forces two years ago to support family farmers around the globe in boosting their production and finding ways to reach new overseas customers.One example of that collaboration is their support of a women’s cooperative from Ethiopia’s Tigray region, which produced more than 3,300 pounds of cactus pear marmalade that are fully in line with both Ethiopian and European food safety standards. Now shoppers can purchase the marmalade, packaged in 4,000 jars, being sold by Eataly in Rome, according to FAO.“We are here to recognize the role of family farmers and especially the role of women who are key to achieving food security in Africa,” said FAO Director-General Graziano da Silva at an event held at the Eataly store in Rome. “FAO is grateful to Eataly which is giving the opportunity to this product to be distributed as a gourmet product here in Europe.”The partnership was supported by the Italian Development Cooperation agency, according to FAO.The teamwork with Eataly is an example of FAO’s focus on partnerships. Since 2013, the agency has signed over 60 agreements with a wide range of different stakeholders, including the private sector, civil society, non-governmental organizations, cooperatives and academia. read more